Posts Tagged ‘ philosophy ’

Zero Squared #82: Reading the Way of Things

Sep 1st, 2016 | By

Daniel Coffeen is a rhetor and a philosopher — if by philosopher you mean somebody who plays with concepts and ideas. He formally taught at UC Berkeley and the SF Art Institute but now spends his time writing and consulting. Coffeen is a frequent guest to the Zero Squared podcast and his book Reading the

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Zero Squared #61: Minds, Value, and Irrational Numbers

Mar 24th, 2016 | By

Andy Marshall and I have read philosophy together for something like four years now, and this week’s episode is a recording of what was to be a discussion of Chapter 15 of Marx’s Capital, Volume 1, but what turned into a debate about the difference between the natural sciences and social science, matter and mind,

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Zero Squared 49: Against Capitalist Education

Dec 24th, 2015 | By

Nadim Bakhshov is a member of the museum of thought collective, an imaginal archaeology group specialising in unearthing historical conceptual artefacts and founded a radical post-conceptual art movement with the Argentine pataphysician Kurt César. His book Against Capitalist Education is out from Zero Books right now. The book is written as a philosophical dialogue. The

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Where Zizek Goes Wrong

Nov 20th, 2015 | By

Zizek, don’t just write something… Reading Slavoj Zizek today is, unfortunately, an exercise in repetition. Like many established figures on the left, Zizek recycles his material. Sometimes this self-plagarism can be interesting, watching him redeploy old anecdotes and jokes to make philosophical points can even be enlightening. At other times, however, Zizek would do well

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Zero Squared #37: Dangerous Literature

Sep 23rd, 2015 | By

Tom Sperlinger is the author of Romeo and Juliet in Palestine and he returns this week to discuss teaching Dangerous Literature. This is part one of a two part conversation. This week we focus on the question of polemics in fiction and modernism, and next week we’ll take a close look at Kafka’s unfinished novel

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Foucault’s Madman and his reply to Derrida

Jun 23rd, 2015 | By

To review quickly, Foucault charged Descartes with excluding madness from consideration in his Meditations on First Philosophy. The relevant passage from Foucault’s Folie et Déraison: Histoire de la folie à l’âge classique follows: In the economy of doubt, there is a fundamental disequilibrium between on the one hand madness, and dreams and errors on the

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Zero Squared #6: Cultural Marxism?

Feb 11th, 2015 | By

C Derick Varn is the guest this week. Varn is a reader at Zero Books, a University lecturer and teacher currently living in Mexico, and my co-host on the Pop the Left podcast. In this episode of Zero Squared we briefly discuss his new podcast Symptomatic Redness and then discuss the notion of Cultural Marxism.

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Weird Realism – Lovecraft and Philosophy, Graham Harman

Jan 25th, 2013 | By

A Writer of Gaps and Horror One of the most important decisions made by philosophers concerns the production or destruction of gaps in the cosmos. That is to say, the philosopher can either declare that what appears to be one is actually two, or that what seems to be two is actually one. Some examples will help

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The Quadruple Object

Dec 29th, 2012 | By

This book first appeared in French as L’Objet quadruple: Une métaphysique des choses après Heidegger (Paris: PUF, 2010), in a fine translation by Olivier Dubouclez of Lille. The history of the project shaped the very structure of the book, and may be of interest to the reader. For several years Quentin Meillassoux had expressed the

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The Open Space of the Future – Liam Sprod

Aug 20th, 2012 | By

From guest blogger and Zero Book author Liam Sprod Slavoj Žižek’s new book The Year of Dreaming Dangerously[1] will be out this year and already the final chapter ‘Signs from the Future’ is available[2].  Here Žižek diagnoses the problem of Marx and twentieth century Marxism as being too futural and thus sliding into an apocalyptic

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