Archive for January 2013

Unpatriotic History of the Second World War, James Heartfield

Jan 29th, 2013 | By

The myth of the ‘Good War’ At the conclusion of the First World War, militarism was widely condemned by the intelligentsia, deeply unpopular among working class leaders – a scepticism that entrenched pacifism and socialist anti-militarism in the 1920s and 30s. In September 1934, US Senator Gerald Nye opened a hearing into the munitions industry

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Weird Realism – Lovecraft and Philosophy, Graham Harman

Jan 25th, 2013 | By

A Writer of Gaps and Horror One of the most important decisions made by philosophers concerns the production or destruction of gaps in the cosmos. That is to say, the philosopher can either declare that what appears to be one is actually two, or that what seems to be two is actually one. Some examples will help

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EXTRACT: Ungreat Books – Failure: A Writer’s Life, Joe Milutis

Jan 23rd, 2013 | By

William Gold “William Gold has earned only 50 cents after 18 years of unceasing labor.” Any child who read the Guinness Books between 1976 and 1982 has reflected on these words. In 1976, William Gold first appeared as the world‘s “Least Successful Author,“ a record which he held, tenuously, until 1982. He was not included

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Physical Resistance, Dave Hann

Jan 17th, 2013 | By

Introduction, by Louise Purbrick Doesn’t a breath of air that pervaded earlier days caress us as well? In the voices we hear, isn’t there an echo of the now silent ones? Walter Benjamin When Dave Hann died on 29 September 2009, he left £30 in the bank and a manuscript of over 100,000 words. He had

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Crossing the Threshold – Heterotopia, Caroline Baillie, Jens Kabo & John Reader

Jan 15th, 2013 | By

A Journey into New Ways of Thinking This book is about transformations. Particularly the sort of trans- formations that many would like to see happen in our profession, school, community and country. Transformations that lead to shifts in ways of thinking and being, about who we are, what we do and why we do it.

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Africa’s Che Guevara

Jan 11th, 2013 | By

The history of Africa in the second half of the twentieth century is strewn with dead revolutionaries. Lumumba in the Congo, Cabral in Guinea-Bissau, Biko in South Africa, Mondlane in Mozambique: all were feted as the saviours of their people; all were felled by colder, worldlier foes. These idealists, these visionaries with plans for the

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The End of Oulipo? – Lauren Elkin & Scott Esposito

Jan 9th, 2013 | By

In November 1960 in Paris, a group of writers came together to pledge fealty to a new kind of literature. Calling themselves the Ouvroir de littérature potentielle potentielle (or Workshop of Potential Literature), the Oulipo would seek out, as co-founder Raymond Queneau put it, “new forms and structures that may be used by writers in

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Under Foreign Eyes, James King

Jan 7th, 2013 | By

The Other This book (Under Foreign Eyes, James King) is about the perception of Japan in the sixty films set there by gaijin (foreigners) — outsiders who almost always do not speak or read Japanese. My area of interest is centered on films depicting post World War II Japan and the Japanese, and, in many cases, films showing

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No Local – Why Small-Scale Alternatives Won’t Change The World, Greg Sharzer

Jan 4th, 2013 | By

Some time ago, I was talking with a nutritionist friend about how expensive and time–consuming it is to be poor. You have to chase low–wage jobs, live in poor–quality housing and endure the daily stress of trying to afford the essentials. Government, which used to provide a social safety net, doesn’t help much. Warming to

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Post Cinematic Affect, Steven Shaviro

Jan 2nd, 2013 | By

In this book, I look at four recent media productions – three films and a music video – that reflect, in particularly radical and cogent ways, upon the world we live in today. Olivier Assayas’ Boarding Gate (starring Asia Argento) and Richard Kelly’s Southland Tales (with Justin Timberlake, Dwayne Johnson, Seann William Scott, and Sarah Michelle Gellar)

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